About Bangladesh

 

The culture of Bangladesh refers to the way of life of the people of Bangladesh. The land, the rivers, and the lives of the Bengali people formed a rich heritage with marked differences from neighbouring regions. It has evolved over the centuries and encompasses the cultural diversity of several social groups of Bangladesh. Bangladesh is blessed with deep, rich and fertile soil, a gift from the three major  rivers that form the deltaic plain upon which it sits. The Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna Rivers all wend their way down from the Himalayas, carrying nutrients to replenish Bangladesh’s fields.​

Bangabandhu declared at a historic public meeting held at Ramna Race Course (renamed Suhrawardy Uddyan) on 7 March, 1971, attended by around 2 million people, “The struggle this tune is the struggle for freedom, the struggle this tune is the struggle for independence.” It was a defacto declaration of independence.

​After nine months of war, the Pakistani occupation forces surrendered in Dhaka on 16th December. 1971 after killing an estimated three million people. Due to the heroic resistance and supreme sacrifices of the valiant freedom fighters Bangladesh finally became an independent sovereign state. Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman was the founder- president of Bangladesh.

The Language Movement of 1952 to recognize Bangla as a state language may be termed as the first step towards independence. Political and economic deprivation of the Bengalese prompted Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the Father of the Nation, to put forward in 1966 his historic six points, the “Magna Carta” which in effect structured the foundation for East Pakistan’s future independence.

In the 1970 elections, even though the Awami League emerged as the largest party in Pakistan Parliament, it was not allowed to form the government by the ruling military junta. In the backdrop of a non-cooperation movement launched against the military regime by Awami League,